a-red-rose-revolution
The worker always has the right to leave his employer, but has he the means to do so? And if he does quit him, is it in order to lead a free existence, in which he will have no master but himself? No, he does it in order to sell himself to another employer. He is driven to it by the same hunger which forced him to sell himself to the first employer. Thus the worker’s liberty, so much exalted by the economists, jurists, and bourgeois republicans, is only a theoretical freedom, lacking any means for its possible realization, and consequently it is only a fictitious liberty, an utter falsehood. The truth is that the whole life of the worker is simply a continuous and dismaying succession of terms of serfdom -voluntary from the juridical point of view but compulsory in the economic sense - broken up by momentarily brief interludes of freedom accompanied by starvation; in other words, it is real slavery.
Mikhail Bakunin, The Capitalist System (via marlkarx)
acrylicalchemy
inthemoodtodissolveinthesky:

Mark Rothko, No. 61 (Rust and Blue), 1953

I’m not an abstract artist…I’m not interested in the relationship of colour or form or anything else. I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions—tragedy, ecstasy, doom and so on. And the fact that a lot of people break down and cry when confronted with my pictures shows that I can communicate these basic human emotions…The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience as I had when I painted them. And if you, as you say, are moved only by their color relationships, then you miss the point!
from A conversation with Selden Rodman, 1956 in Writings on Art: Mark Rothko (2006)

inthemoodtodissolveinthesky:

Mark Rothko, No. 61 (Rust and Blue), 1953

I’m not an abstract artist…I’m not interested in the relationship of colour or form or anything else. I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions—tragedy, ecstasy, doom and so on. And the fact that a lot of people break down and cry when confronted with my pictures shows that I can communicate these basic human emotions…The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience as I had when I painted them. And if you, as you say, are moved only by their color relationships, then you miss the point!

from A conversation with Selden Rodman, 1956 in Writings on Art: Mark Rothko (2006)